Torii gate and forecast stone
A stone wall
Five storied pagoda
Last instruction of Ieyasu
Omotemon gate and Nioh statue
Three sacred warehouses
Rest room for the God
Shinkyu sacred stable
Story of three monkeys
Kouya-maki black pine
Omizuya water house
Torii bronze gate
Youmeimon gate
Over 500 sculptures
Frame of Ieyasu's designation
Inverted pillar
Human sculpture
Children and Ieyasu
Shed for sacred sedan chair
Kaguraden stage
Restoration of cultural property
Kitouden prayer hall
Karamon gate
Sleeping cat
Sakashita-mon gate
Kairou corridor
Honsha central shrine
General's room
Stone room
Haiden Oratory
Honden main hall
Spiritual animal
Nature
Okusha inner shrine
Okusha Haiden Oratory
Inukimon gate
Okusha treasure tower
Showrow bell tower, Korou drum tower
Crying dragon
Lanterns
Korean bell
Carvings on the wainscot
Jumping lion
Rinzo revolving shelf
Former Karamon gate,
Torii stone gate
Person's face on the trunk
Toshogu Treasure House
Guest hall
Toshogu Museum of Art
Traditional event
Samurai-style 1,000-person procession
Omamori
(Charm in brocade bag)



Portrait of Ieyasu. It was written by Sansetsu Kano.
Feature of Ieyasu is expressed well.


Ieyasu Tokugawa was born in the warring states period. He survived the chaos, and unified entire the country. Ieyasu was assigned as Seii-taishogun (Great generalissimo) in 1603 and opened the Tokugawa Shogunate in Edo (Tokyo). He watched the whole nation even after he retired. Ieyasu left last instruction, which was about after the death.
"Enshrine my dead body in Mt. Kuno (His hometown in Shizuoka prefecture) for the first year of the death. (Omission) And built a small shrine in Nikko and enshrine me as the God. I will be the guardian of Japan."

Ieyasu was dead on April 17th, 1616, when he was 75 years old. Shrine was built in Nikko and divine designation "Tosho-Daigongen" was given by Imperial court. He was enshrined in accordance with his last will.

Ieyasu aimed to be the guardian of Japan. Nikko is located on the north of Edo. The north was considered as the taboo direction, where demons come into. Therefore, he wanted to place himself in the taboo direction in order to protect Japan from the evil things. He hoped long life of Tokugawa government and the eternal peace.

Although, Ieyasu wanted "A small shrine," the third successive shogun Iemitsu reformed the shrine into today's gorgeous building. Most of existing buildings were built in the period of big reforming. According to income-and-outgo report, it cost 40,000,000,000 yen for today' currency. 140,000 wooden materials were consumed. It took total number of 4,540,000 people 1 year and 5 months to complete construction. Also, 35 buildings were reformed in that period. That big reforming ended in 1636.


Japanese/English matching list
From left-up to the right-down on the map

Japanese
Pronunciation
English

Okusha

Inner (Back) Shrine

Houtou

Treasure Tower

Inukimon

Inukimon Gate

Doujinko

Copper Divine Warehouse

Doutorii

Copper Torii Gate

Nikko Toshogu

Toshogu Shrine
Honsha Main Shrine
Honden Main Hall
Ishinoma Room of Stone
Haiden Oratory
Gokurouka Corridor

Shogun Chakuzanoma Seating room of Shogun

Sukibei

Transparent fence

Tobikoeno-shishi

Jumping Lion

Shinyosha

Shed of Portable Shrine

Kaitendourou

Revolving Lantern

Karamon

Karamon Gate

Kitouden
(Kamishamusho)

Prayer Hall
(Upper office)

Sakashitamon

Sakashitamon Gate

Nemurineko

Sleeping Cat

Kairou

Corridor

Nakiryu

Crying Dragon

Honchidou
(Yakushidou)

Honchi-doh Hall
(Yakushi-doh Hall)

Korou

Drum Tower

Yomeimon

Yomeimon Gate

Kairou-douhame

Wainscot of Corridor

Chousengane

Korean Bell

Shourou

Bell Tower

Tsuritourou

Hung Lantern

Kamijinko
(Souzouno-zou)

Upper Sacred Warehouse
(Imaginary Elephant)

Nakajinko

Middle Sacred Warehouse

Saijo

Rest Room for the God

Omizuya

Water House

Sanjinko

Three Sacred Warehouse

Shimojinko

Lower Sacred Warehouse

Uchibansha

Guard's House

Sansaru

Three Monkeys

Shinkyusha

Sacred Stable

Kouyamaki

Black Pine

Omotemon
(Nioh)

Omotemon Gate
(Niohmon Gate)

Ishigaki, Aboumaru

Stone Wall, Stone of Aboumaru

Gojunotou

Five-storied Pagoda

Ishidorii

Stone Torii Gate



Ieyasu led the battle in 1615, Osaka.
He accomplished unification of Japan after he defeated Hideyori Toyotomi.



Nikko Tourist Association
Postal: 321-1404, 591 Goko-machi Nikko, Tochigi
TEL: +81-288-54-2496 FAX: +81-288-54-2495

Nikko Tourist Association, Ashio branch office
Postal: 321-1523, 6-3 Matsubara Ashio-machi Nikko, Tochigi
TEL: +81-288-93-3417 FAX: +81-288-93-3467